YOSHIHIKO UEDA | 上田義彦

books

M.River

2013,916Press & Akaaka Art Publishing, 916Press & 赤々舎

Design : Hideki Nakajima

Into the woods, out of the woods

 

 

Yoshihiko Ueda is a photographer who staunchly refuses to be described as an artist. I can see him now, a large box camera on his back, climbing up the mountain paths of Yakushima. He once did that in the sacred land of the native North American Quinault people, but what is important is that he has never been what the world calls a “nature photographer.” “Going into the woods” is an essential part of the photo-taking process for Yoshihiko Ueda, something more than just study or training. It is something to do with what is at the core of the photographs conceived by him. What do the woods signify for photographer, Yoshihiko Ueda? Having followed his pursuit, I’ve been thinking about that. And now, with his “M. River” series of photographs in front of me, I feel the urge to think about it again.

A photograph captures an image of something but it’s not really that simple. We see things. We recognize things visually through our eyes. We store the visual images that our eyes have captured. Taking this idea to an extreme, the urge to take photographs existed long before the mechanism of the photograph existed. The writer Marcel Proust referred them as “latent images,” but the fragments of his thinking about photographs tell us about the “sense of realness” around the time photography came to exist. The various forces of processes such as “seeing” or “watching,” or a “gaze” or “image” were dynamic forces inside human beings before the advent of photography. Because the “innocent mechanism” of the photograph is an innocent “other party” for human beings, it imparts grace and favor to human beings.

There are a number of such graces. Take the “gaze” for example. A photograph is a record of something but in actual fact, it a record of the “gaze” of the person taking the photograph. You can understand the “gaze,” by, for example, looking at someone who is looking at some scenery. I am looking at something in the same way as he is looking at something, and that is becoming aware of the “gaze.” I am looking at the world but the device of the photograph reconfirms for us what we are seeing. The gaze is “objectified” and we are made conscious of it. In that sense, a photograph is nothing more than something with which to visualize the urge that was already inside us before the advent of photography and to give that urge inside us some kind of form. The amazing “power of photography” relates not only to the detail of the subject but also transmits the “gaze.” Photo collections and prints enlarge your immersion in the “gaze ”of other people, something that was pointed out by the psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan and which inspired Roland Barthes’s approach to picture-taking.

Yoshihiko Ueda’s “M River,” is a reenactment of “the power of photography in its origins” described above. The act of seeing as written in the East – as both 見る (to see) and 観る (to watch) – could also be described as the objectification of the “gaze.” The “half-closed eyes” or “introspection” in Zen and Esoteric Buddhist meditation rids one of evil thoughts by extrospection and is regarded as a process for finding the truth of the world and of oneself. Where the world and oneself coalesce and are regarded as one, there is “enlightenment” or a “state.” Suffering is part of that, but we are suddenly thrust into the innocent “other party” grace and favor of the photograph. There may be more than a few people who think in this way about the photographic process, but when you consider the uniqueness of Yoshihiko Ueda’s photographs, I realize that they are forced to think in this way. The reason photography came from Western civilization was not because of ideas. Now in the 21st century, however, photographs have become an important device for regenerating or newly generating the world. Ancient wisdom and animism are, on the contrary, an opportunity to open up the future.

The photographs in “M River” were taken with a tripod in a place where I think Ueda could see and feel something in the forest. He didn’t know the reason or the answer “beforehand.” None was given. But Yoshihiko Ueda touched the image and endeavored faithfully to visualize it. In the background to that, there is humility for what we call the world. The form that humility takes is reminiscent of the beautiful instinct of the people of the ancient world to appreciate the blessings of nature and to cherish the cycle of give-and-take. While many other photographers are stuck in their small egos and their self-expression, the secret that has acquired the power projected by Yoshihiko Ueda alone can be found here.

The masters of Noh and Kyogen talk about “riken no ken,” meaning to watch oneself while one is acting. Conversely if you detach yourself from yourself, you become one with the world. It could be said that an ideal form of the “gaze” was being created from before the advent of photography.

When I ask Yoshihiko Ueda why he took pictures of the “river,” he said because was there was a river there and he had come across it. He’s probably not able to describe anything more than the joy of being able to see and the joy of being able to turn something into a photograph. However, the photograph that at first glance appears to be rustic is in fact a complex product. No, it would be more correct to call it a rich product. The water, the plants and the stones that have lost their shape, have become blurred and a mass of light confront us as intense images, however, on the photo. This is not a mere playing around with different effects. It is the objectification and the visualization of what it means to “see.”
The reiteration and reenactment of Yoshihiko Ueda’s “into the woods, out of the woods” will probably go on, but for him, it is the act of always returning to the cycle that photographs fundamentally possess (it is that that gives him the greatest joy and happiness). He is not a photographer who travels horizontally seeking to find the form that nature shows us (a collector of images). He is a photographer who travels vertically back towards to the origin. But why the woods?

What does “into the woods” mean? “Into the woods.” When I think about Yoshihiko Ueda going into the woods, it makes me remember something Henry D. Thoreau wrote.

I found in myself, and still find, an instinct toward a higher, or, as it is named, spiritual life, as do most men, and another toward a primitive rank and savage one, and I reverence them both. I love the wild not less than the good. [1]

 

Thoreau thus enters the woods to go fishing and hunting. In 1845, he moved to Walden Pond and continued to live there for two and a half years as he learnt about the grace and favor of the woods. His book Walden: Or, Life in the Woods is a written record of the life and spirit of a “civilized man” who “enters the woods and leaves the woods,” which strongly influenced hippie culture, many cultural anthropologist field workers and people who sought an organic lifestyle. We are not Native Americans, nor Jomon people. We are born in the modern world. Can we obtain that same cycle with the woods? Walden: Or, Life in the Woods can give us important guidance about that. As the hunter with a gun, regardless of whether he had done religious study, knows about the cycle of grace and favor from nature, can photographers also reach the level of such workings of nature? I wonder about this as I look at Yoshihiko Ueda’s “M.River.” Thoreau has said that people who live in the fields and the forest, in other words, people who have, in a certain sense, fully become part of nature, can encounter nature in the way nature “reveals itself.” This, however, is in any event a great ordeal. With the grammar we have acquired through civilization, the meaninglessness of confronting nature is thrust upon us ad nauseam. The photos included in the QUINAULT photo collection were ones that were placed in his hand by discarding himself. They are a beautiful record that came to exist by accepting all of the forest and humbly extolling its detail. In comparison, Materia did not stop there. It was unknown fruits obtained by moving further forward. Among the people who were expecting the sequel to QUINAULT, there are some who were puzzled. Photographer Yoshihiko Ueda, however, is a courageous person. He is continuing his journey. As Thoreau writes: “How happy’s he who hath due place assigned / To his beasts, and disaforested his mind!” [2] He is exploring the “soul of the woods.” There is a strong sense of that in “Materia” and the “M River” series.

If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings. In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty, nor weakness.[3]

 

Thud Thoreau describes the wisdom given to him by the woods. “The license of a higher order.” As I look through Yoshihiko Ueda’s “M. River” photographs, I realize there is no better set of words than those to describe them.
At the risk of repeating myself, the people who are masters of the “innocent mechanism” of the photograph receive immense grace and favor from nature. Like something seen in a dream, looking at the photograph of the river in the woods existing somewhere in this universe never gets old for me, and I’ll probably be looking at it forever.

1. Henry David Thoreau, Walden: Or, Life in the Woods, Dover Publications, 1995, p. 136.
2. (Thoreau quoting the poem by John Donne) Ibid., p. 142.
3. Ibid, p. 209.

 

森へ入り、森をでる

 

上田義彦は、写真家である。もし彼に、アーティストと呼びかけたなら、かたくなにそれを拒むだろう。大きなボックスカメラを背おい、屋久島の山道を登ってゆく上田義彦の姿を想いうかべる。それはかつて、北米のネイティブアメリカンの聖地QUINAULTにおいても行われたことであり、しかし重要なのは、彼が世に名づけられるネイチャーフォトグラファーなどでは決してないということだ。「上田義彦の写真」において、「森へ入る」ということは、彼の写真行為において欠くべからざる過程であり、それは「修業」などという安易な言葉すら超えて、上田義彦が考える写真のあり様の根本にかかわるものと思われる。写真家・上田義彦における森とは何か。そのことを僕はずっと並走し、考えてきた。そして今また、『M.River』という写真群を前にして、そのことをさらに考えたいと強く思う。
写真は事物を写し撮るものだが、ことはそう単純ではない。私たちはモノを見る。眼を使い、視覚により世界を認知する。とりこまれた視覚像はイメージとして記憶化される。極論すれば写真という機械の出現以前にも、写真という衝動は存在した。文学者マルセル・プルーストはそれを、「潜像」と呼んだが、彼が残した写真についての思考の断片は、写真が誕生してまもない時期の「実感」を我々におしえてくれる。「見る」あるいは「観る」という過程について、あるいは「まなざし」「イメージ」についての多様な力は、写真出現以前から人間の内で、ダイナミックに動いていたのである。写真という無垢な機械は、人間にとり無垢な他者ゆえに、人間に恩寵を与えることになったのだ。
その恩寵はいくつもある。たとえば、「まなざし」について。写真は事物の記録であるが、実は撮り手の「まなざし」の記録である。「まなざし」とは、例えば、誰かが景色を見ているのを見ればわかる。彼のように私も見ているということが「まなざし」の意識化ということだ。我々は世界を見ているが、写真という装置は、我々に見ることの再確認をしいる。「まなざし」を客観化し、自覚するということだ。その意味で写真は、「写真出現以前」にすでにある内的衝動を可視化し、カタチを与えるということに他ならない。したがって、すぐれた「写真の力」は、被写体の細部の力だけではなく、「まなざし」の伝染をひきおこす。写真集やプリントは、他の人の「まなざし」に没入することを拡張していく。このことは、精神分析医のジャック・ラカンが指摘し、それをヒントにロラン・バルトが写真へのアプローチとしたことであった。
上田義彦の『M.River』は、上述したような「起原における写真の力」を、あらためて再演するものだ。東洋においては「見る」とも「観る」とも書き綴ってきた。そこには、「見ることの客観化」の意識が働いている。「まなざし」の客観化とも言ってよい。禅や密教の瞑想における「半眼」や「内観」は、外観による邪念をとりはらい、世界と自らの真の姿にたどりつく過程としてとらえられてきた。そして、世界と自らを合一させ、一つながりとしてとらえるところに「悟り」や「境地」を置いた。その過程には、苦業がともなうのだが、写真という無垢なる他者の恩寵は、それをいきなり我々につきつける。およそ写真の過程をこのように考える者は少ないかもしれないが、上田義彦の写真のもつユニークさを考える時、このように思考しなければならないと僕は思う。西洋文明の中で、写真が生まれた理由は、思考のためではなかった。しかし、21世紀の今、写真は世界を再生・新生させるための大切な装置になったのだと思われる。太古の知恵やアニミズムがかえって、未
来を開く契機となるがごとく。

『M.River』の写真は、彼が森の中で何かが見えた、感じたと思う場所に三脚が立てられ撮られている。その理由や答えは、彼には「あらかじめ」にはわからない。与えられていない。しかし、その像を丁寧に触り、可視化する努力を上田義彦は忠実に行う。その背景には世界というものに対する謙虚さというものがある。その謙虚な姿は、かつて自然の恵みに感謝し、ギブアンドテイクという回路を大切にした古代人の美しい本能を僕に想起させる。他の写真家の多くが、小さな自我や自己表現にとどまるなかで、上田義彦のみが突出した力を体得している秘密は、ここにある。
能・狂言の名人たちは、「離見の見」ということを言う。それは演じながら、演じている自分を同時に観ることだ。離れることで、逆に世界と合一する。そのような「まなざし」のあり様を我々は「写真出現以前」からつくり上げてきたと言ってよい。
上田義彦がなぜ「川」を撮ったかを彼に問うても、彼はそこに川があり、川と出逢った。そして見えることの「よろこび」、写真化することの「よろこび」以上のことを語らないだろう。しかし一見、素朴に思われる写真は実に複雑な産物である。いや、豊かな産物と言ったほうが正確だろう。カタチを失い、ぼやけ、光のかたまりとなった水や植物や石は、しかし写真の上で強烈な像として我々の眼前につきつけられている。これは、ただのエフェクトの遊びではない。「観る」ということの客観化、可視化なのだから。
上田義彦の「森に入り、森を出る」ということの反復・再演はこれからも続けられるだろうが、それは彼にとって、写真が根元的にもっている回路(それが彼に最大の「よろこび」「うれしさ」を与える)に、つねにたちかえる行為であるということだ。彼は自然が見せてくれる貌を求めて水平に旅する写真家(イメージのコレクター)ではなく、起原へ垂直に旅をする写真家なのである。しかし、なぜ森なのだろう。
「森へ入る」ということは、どのようなことなのだろう。「森へ入る」。その上田義彦の姿を想いうかべる時、ヘンリー・D・ソローのことを僕は連想する。ソローはこう書くのだ。

「ぼくは自分自身のなかに、ほとんどの人と同じようにより高いいわゆる精神生活を求める本能と、原始的でまったく野蛮な生活を求める本能の両方を見つけ出した。それはいまでも変わらず、その両方をだいじにしている。善というものに劣らず、野性というものを愛しているのだ」

そうしてソローは森へ入り、釣りや狩猟に出かける。1845年に彼はウォールデン池畔に移り住み、森の恩寵のしくみを学びながら2年半にわたり生活を続けた。彼が書いた『森の生活 ウォールデン』は、「文明人」が「森へ入り、森を出る」生活と精神の記録の書として、ヒッピーカルチャーや、多くの文化人類学のフィールドワーカー、オーガニックライフの人たちに強い影響力を与えてきた。ネイティブアメリカンでもなく、縄文人でもなく、「現代」に生まれた我々が、いかに「森との回路」を獲得できるか。その重要な案内の書なのだ。
銃を持つ猟師が、宗教的修業をへないにもかかわらず、自然からの恩寵の回路を智るように、写真家たちもまたそのような営みに到達しうるのだろうか。上田義彦の『M.River』を見ながら、そんなことを考える。ソローは、野原や森で生活している人たち、つまり、ある意味で自分が自然の一部になり切っている人たちは、自然が「自らをさらけ出している」様に出あうことができるのだと言う。しかし、それは、いずれにせよ大きな試練を与える。文明の中で身につけてきた文法で、自然にたちむかうことの無意味さを、いやというほどつきつけられるからだ。写真集『QUINAULT』におさめられている写真は、自分を捨てることによって手に入れられた森の写真であった。そして、森のすべてをうけ入れ、細部を謙虚にたたえるということにより成立した、美しい記録である。それに比べ『Materia』は、そこにとどまることなく、さらに先へと進んだことで得られた未知の果実であった。単純な『QUINAULT』の続篇を期待していた人の中には、とまどいさえ見られた。しかし、上田義彦という写真家は、勇気ある者である。彼はさらなる旅へむかった。「自分のなかの野獣に適当な居場所を与え自分の心の森を開拓した人はなんとしあわせなことか!」とソローは綴る。「心の森」を開拓する。僕はそのことを『Materia』そして続篇の『M.River』に強く感じる。
「もし人が自分の夢の方向へ自信をもって進み、思い描いていた生活を送ろうと努力すれば、ふだんでは想像もつかなかった成功にめぐり会えるだろう。背後になにかを残し、目には見えない境界線を超えるだろう。新しい、普遍的な、もっと自由な法則が自分の周囲や内部に確立しはじめるだろう。あるいは古い法則が拡張され、より自由な意味で自分の思うように解釈され、存在というもののより高次元な秩序のライセンスを手に入れて生きてゆくだろう。自分の生活を簡素にするにつれ、宇宙の法則から複雑さが消えてゆき、孤独が孤独でなく、貧しさが貧しさでなく、弱さが弱さでなくなるだろう。」

ソローは、森が彼にもたらしてくれた智恵をそう語っている。「より高次元な秩序のライセンス」。目の前にある上田義彦の『M.River』の写真を見ながら、これほどまでにぴったりなコトバはないと思う。
再度くり返すが、写真という無垢な機械を見事にあつかう者は、自然から大いなる恩寵を得る。夢を可視化したような、この宇宙のどこかにあるのであろう森の川の写真を、僕は見飽きることなく、いつまででも見続けることになるだろう。

出典
ヘンリー・D・ソロー『森の生活 ウォールデン』 真崎義博訳 、JICC出版局、1981年、161頁、 251頁