YOSHIHIKO UEDA | 上田義彦

books

SHIMAE

2011, SEIGENSHA Art Publishing, 青幻舎

Design : Toshio Yamagata

To the island

With my own eyes I saw the unimaginable power of the land; of wind, of fire, of water, of the heavens.
Faced with such terrific force, it is only natural that human beings resort to prayer, seek some respite for the soul.
Gazing on Miyakejima I sensed that on our planet, this is the role which humans have been assigned.
Since ancient times the people of Miyake have shared their home with an erupting volcano, and with each eruption, prayed to the mountain, to appease its spirit and soothe their own.
Bound inextricably to the volcano, they enjoyed the fruits of the land, and sustained life.
Then came the island's first ever full evacuation, prompted by a dangerously high concentration of toxic volcanic gas.
I witnessed first hand what happens to an island from which the people have gone.
Their inhabitants lost, the deserted houses seemed cruelly broken. As were the people.

The Miyake islanders know only too well from their experience of the past decade how the evacuation orders taken for granted as necessary to achieve the paramount aim of preserving life, and the evacuation centers ostensibly provided with the best of intentions, can, little by little, bring about a loss of personal dignity and individual freedom of spirit; emergency accommodation morphing into detention center in all but name.
Surveying the scene on Miyake I wondered if understanding the experience of the islanders might help us to ease the enormous difficulties caused by forced evacuation in the wake of the unthinkable devastation in Iwate and Miyagi, and radioactive contamination from the nuclear power plant at Fukushima.

The comment of one Miyake man was truly heartrending. If the same thing happened again, he declared, he'd defy the evacuation order, preferring to risk life and limb on the run with his family. “I've vowed never to leave the island,” he said, “come what may.”
Meaning that if leaving required the surrender of one's spirit, then surrendering the flesh would be of no concern.
And one elderly evacuee shipped out to Tokyo apparently said that if he could cross the threshold of his Miyake home just once more, he would quite happily die there and then.
Painful reminders that it is the spirit that sustains the flesh.
It is the flesh that evacuation centers are designed to protect; protecting the spirit is a far greater challenge.
Coming to Miyakejima I sensed that these people's lives could only be sustained by the land and homes in which they had been born and raised. Five, ten years have passed since the evacuation, and people have returned. The island's lifeblood seems restored, the land rejoicing.
I'm certain that for the island, people are a vital component of that lifeblood.

Believing too much in the power of science we hurtle onward, all the while at the mercy of the power we've managed to acquire.
To me, it seems the only logical end to it all is darkness.
In focusing my gaze on Miyakejima I wanted to ponder how we relate to those dwelling places we cannot do without.
Human beings have an important role to play.
Photographing Miyakejima and the people who've returned there to live quiet lives of great resilience, it struck me forcefully that this island, needs these people.

May 2011, on Miyakejima

Miyakejima - green island, isle of birdsong
No banquet awaits on Miyake, but there's raw bonito and sweet potato saké.
Glimpses of faraway Miyake, in red camellias and raven-haired beauty.
Come, let's talk on the beach at Okubo
About as many things as there are grains of sand.

From the folk verse Miyakejima-bushi, Intangible Folk Cultural Property

島へ

大地の、風の、火の、水の、天の
想像を絶する力を目の当たりにした。
その荒ぶる力の前では、人は自然に、ただ祈り、鎮魂する。
この惑星の中で、人はその役割を与えられているのだと
三宅島の姿を見てそう感じた。
太古の昔から、火山の噴火と付き合い、そのたびに山に祈り、鎮魂し続けてきた。
人はそれに寄り添いながら、大地の恵みを享受し、命を繋いできた。
高濃度の火山性有毒ガスによって引き起こされた、
島にとって初めての全島避難。
人がいなくなった島に、何が起こったのかをこの目で見た。
そこでは、取り残された家々が住む人を失い無惨に壊れていた、そして人も。

人命を守るという大目的において当然と思われる避難命令が、
そして善意であるはずの避難所が、
その後しだいに、個人の尊厳や個人の精神の自由を奪うこととなり、
避難所という名の収容所となりかねぬことを
三宅の人々はこの十年間の経験で知っている。
未曾有の大災害にあった、岩手、宮城、そして福島の原子力発電所の
放射能汚染による強制的な避難が人々にもたらす、大きな困難を、
三宅島の人々の経験を知る事によって幾分かでも軽減出来るのではないだろうかと
三宅の風景を見ながらそう思った。

「今度避難命令が出たとしても、自分はそれには従わず、
命をかけて家族とともに島中を逃げまどう。絶対に島を出て行かないと
深く心に誓った。」と言った一人の男の言葉が心に深く突き刺さった。
精神の自由を失うくらいなら、肉体を失っても構わないと言っているのだ。
またある老人は、東京の避難先で「三宅の家の敷居をまたげさえすれば、
そこでその瞬間に死んでも構わない。」と言ったそうだ。
人は精神によって肉体を支えているのだと痛感した。
避難所が守ろうとしているのは、肉体であって、精神を守ることは難しい。
それらの人々のイノチを守ることができるのは、生まれ育った大地と家であると、
三宅島に来て感じた。その後、五年、十年という時が流れ、島に人が帰ってきた。
島に循環がよみがえり、大地に喜びがもどりつつあるように感じた。
島にとって、人は大事な循環の一部なのだ、と強く思う。

科学の力を信用しすぎ、手にした力に翻弄され暴走している。
この流れの先には、暗黒しかないと感じる。
今一度、このかけがえのない私たちの住処との付き合い方を、
三宅島を見つめながら考えたいと思った。
人には、大事な役割がある。
三宅島の姿や、そこに帰り、静かに力強く暮らす人々を撮影しながら
この島に、この人々が必要なのだと強く感じた。

二〇十一年五月 三宅島にて

三宅島かよ 緑の島か 小鳥さえずる歌の島。

三宅来たとて馳走はないが 生の鰹に芋の酒。

赤い椿に黒髪姿 遠い三宅が忍ばれる。

来たら語りましょ大久保浜で 砂の数程こまごまと。

無形民族文化財『三宅島節』より