YOSHIHIKO UEDA | 上田義彦

soloexhibitions

materia

2012, Gallery916 (Tokyo) /

「materia」Gallery916 (東京)

Overview
Date : Feb 10, 2012 - Apr 10, 2012
Open : Tuesday to Friday 11:00 –20:00
Saturday and holiday 11:00 –18:00
Closed Sundays and Mondays
Venue : Gallery 916
6F No.3 SUZUE Bldg.1-14-24 Kaigan , Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0022, Japan
Contact Us : tel+81-(3)-5403-9161/fax +81-(3)-5403-9162
mail@gallery916.com
http://gallery916.com
Admission : Free

The Life of the Forest

by Christopher Phillips

In every age and in every culture, the tree has been regarded as one of the greatest symbols of life--a universal, elemental form. Because trees are the apogee of the plant world, as human beings are the most highly developed part of the animal world, it is always tempting to see a tree in terms of an equivalent human form. A treetop is like a head, brushing against the clouds. A tree trunk is as erect, or as gnarled, as a human torso. The tree’s branches extend like arms toward the heavens. The veins of a leaf resemble those of a hand. The roots suggest feet planted solidly in the earth.

Beyond these morphological parallels, trees hold an irresistible fascination for people who care to meditate on what has come before them, and what will come after. Trees stand for a concept of time extending far beyond the span of a single human life. A venerable, old-growth tree has seen countless human generations come and go. Such trees are more than just witnesses to the flow of time. Year after year, ring after ring, their physical substance slowly comes to embody the annual cycle of the seasons. Gazing upon a group of towering, ancient trees that have survived for centuries, every observer immediately feels their commanding presence, and the inner power that has enabled them to withstand the tumultuous uncertainties of time.

The photographs in this book were made by Yoshihiko Ueda on Yakushima, a small, circular, mountain-covered island lying to the southwest of Japan between Kyushu and Okinawa. Formed roughly 13 million years ago, Yakushima is recognized today as the site of one of our planet’s most heterogeneous mixtures of climatic zones, ranging from subtropical to subarctic. Yakushima’s abundant rainfall, as well as the rivers and waterfalls encountered at lower elevations, support an extraordinary variety of life-forms. Perhaps the most astonishing of these are found in the ancient woodlands that occupy the upper altitudes of the island’s mountains. These primeval forests are home to some of the oldest trees on earth, cypresses and Yakusugi (Japanese cedars) more than one thousand years old. One celebrated cedar, the Jomon Sugi, stands more than 25 meters tall and measures more than 16 meters around its trunk; its age has been estimated at considerably more than two millennia.

In the spring of 2011, Yoshihiko Ueda traveled to Yakushima to photograph the ancient trees and forests there. He felt a compelling urge to finally carry out the photographic journey to Yakushima that had occupied his thoughts for almost two decades. His journey took place not long after a cataclysmic earthquake and tsunami struck northeastern Japan, leaving more than 15,000 people dead.

Ueda went to Yakushima expecting that his photographs would form a counterpart to the “Quinault” series that he had made in the early 1990s in the rain-shrouded Quinault forest in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. In this realm of permanent mist and drizzle live some of the world’s largest spruce, cedar, fir, and maple trees, as well as a profusion of mosses, wildflowers, and berries. Ueda’s initial reaction to the Quinault forest was one of awe. "I had discovered a realm of primordial chaos,” he wrote.“ I was witness to what was not for human eyes to see." His photographs from that time portray a mysterious, almost submarine world that sunlight barely penetrates, where towering old-growth trees are packed together in claustrophobic proximity. Many trees are completely enveloped in phosphorescent moss and have only short, stubby limbs remaining; this lends them the eerie appearance of ghostlike figures walking with arms stiffly extended. Exquisitely rendering the dizzying profusion of life-forms that inhabit the dark Quinault forest, Ueda’s photographs also suggest the subtle interconnections of a hardy ecosystem that is slowly unfolding in time—a natural order that, with patience, we can gradually learn to understand.

When Ueda reached Yakushima in the spring of 2011 and set out with his 8 x 10-inch view camera, he knew that he wanted to concentrate on the power of nature—and specifically on the enduring life-force of the island’s ancient trees. He arrived with his earlier photographs of the Quinault forest clearly in mind. But as soon as he set up his camera in Yakushima's high-altitude forest and began to look at the images formed on the ground glass of his camera, he realized that he would have to find a completely new photographic approach. It occurred to him that much had changed in the years since he had photographed Quinault. At that time, he was in his 30s, and not yet a father; now he is in his 50s, with four children in his family. Then he was a relentless photographic perfectionist, determined to work out every visual element in advance; now he had come to appreciate the charm of photographic spontaneity, and to savor the unexpected sights that sometimes flickeringly presented themselves to his camera.

Ueda says that as he silently gazed upon the trees and forests of Yakushima, he distinctly felt the circulation of nature’s life-forms, and the presence of many layers of time. He saw not only the giant tree trunks--whose Latin name, materia, would provide the title for his new series of photographs--but also the old, yellowed leaves piled up on the forest floor and the new branches with their tiny green leaves. Everything had a purpose and a meaning, and everything was related; that, he understood, was the special joy of nature. To convey the rush of complex emotions that he felt, Ueda decided that he would have to take everything he knew about photography and somehow devise a new visual language, one especially suited to his experience on Yakushima.

The most surprising aspect of Ueda’s “Materia” series is the way that he intentionally turns what more conventional photographers would call technical mistakes into controllable, expressive means; these he uses to visually suggest the ever-changing and unpredictable life of the forest. To take one example: in “Quinault,” Ueda went to great lengths to achieve a clear, unobstructed view of his woodland scenes; in “Materia,” however, he often places his camera so that our view of a central majestic tree is partially blocked, as by the thick diagonal line of a fallen tree that stretches across the frame. Another: in the “Quinault” photographs, the entire scene is always in sharp focus, from the near foreground to the distant background; in “Materia,” Ueda employs a much more idiosyncratic approach, focusing on a single object or plane and allowing everything else in the photograph to drift out of focus. Finally, where in “Quinault” the murky depths of the rainforest are rendered in a host of dark, submerged blues and greens, the photographs in “Materia” are relentlessly sun-dazed. Sections of many pictures appear to be purposely overexposed, leaving the details blasted away as if by a sudden explosion of light. Ultimately, these startling photographic “mistakes” help us to imagine in vivid and unexpected ways how the passage of time must appear to a thousand-year-old tree, whose existence slowly unfolds amid the buzz and blur of more transient life-forms such as ferns, flowers, insects, and birds.

On occasion, Ueda's camera pulls back to an unobstructed view, usually to show us a scene in which one ancient tree is accompanied by a troupe of young saplings hoping to find a place for themselves in the dense forest. There are repeated glimpses of fallen trees, often surrounded by broken branches and other natural debris; these scenes recall the purposeful decay that enriches the soil and prepares the way for the next generation of growth. While meditating upon these sometimes somber images, a profound vision of the endlessly recurring life-cycle of nature slowly takes shape in the viewer’s mind.

Since photography’s beginnings in the nineteenth century, images of trees and forests have shown how much can be accomplished by the photographic medium when it is employed by a sophisticated visual artist. Notable instances that spring to mind include the silhouettes of bare-branched winter trees made by William Henry Fox Talbot in England in the 1840s; the portraits of proud Sequoia trees made by Carleton Watkins in California’s Yosemite Valley in the 1860s; the delicate patterns of leaves and branches that can be discovered in the 1920s photographs of Shinzo Fukuhara; and the blissfully erotic tree forms found in Edward Weston’s photographs of 1930s. In this line of remarkable achievements, the “Materia” photographs made by Yoshihiko Ueda on Yakushima can rightly take their place.

Christopher Phillips is the curator at the International Center of Photography in New York.

開催概要
会期 : 2012年2月10日 - 2012年4月10日
開館時間 : 火〜金 11:00 - 20:00
土、祝日 11:00 - 18:00
休館日 : 日曜日、月曜日
会場 : Gallery 916
〒105-0022 東京都港区海岸1-14-24 鈴江第3ビル 6F
お問い合わせ : tel 03-5403-9161 / fax 03-5403-9162
mail@gallery916.com
http://gallery916.com
入場 : 無料

森の生命
クリストファー・フィリップス

いつの時代どの文明でも、樹木は大いなる生命の象徴――万国共通の自然の原型――と見なされてきた。動物界における最も発達した存在が人間なら、木は植物界の☆頂点【アポジー】にあるからだろう、木を見るとつい人間の姿になぞらえたくなる。雲にも届きそうな樹頭はまさに人の頭だ。すっくと伸びた、あるいは曲がった樹幹は人の胴体を思わせる。天に向かって伸び広がる枝は腕のようだ。葉脈は手の静脈に似ている。根は大地をしっかり踏みしめた足だ。

外見上の類似だけではない。自分が生まれる前の世界はどんなふうだったのか、死んだ後はどうなるのかとふと考えたくなる人にとって、木は大いなる魅力を秘めた存在だ。一個人の寿命を遙かに凌いで生き続ける木は、悠久の時の表象なのである。崇高さをたたえた古木は、人が生まれ去っていくのを幾世代にもわたって見守ってきた。そんな古木は、時の流れの単なる目撃者にとどまらない。一年ごとに年輪を重ねながらゆっくりと、木は四季の移ろいを物理的に具体化していく。何世紀もの時を生き延びてきた、天にそびえる老木の群落にじっと目を凝らせば、誰しも即座に、その圧倒的な存在感を、栄枯盛衰に彩られた時の気まぐれを耐え抜いた内なるパワーを感知するはずだ。

この写真集『MATERIA』に収められているのは、上田義彦が日本の南西部、九州と沖縄のあいだに位置する屋久島(ほぼ全域を山で覆われた円形の小島)で撮影した作品である。約1300万年前に形成されたこの島は、今日、亜熱帯から亜寒帯までを網羅する、地上もっとも特異な混合気候帯のひとつとして知られている。標高の低い場所で見られる河川や滝はもとより、豊富な雨の恵みによって多種多彩な生命体が育まれている。とりわけ驚異的なのは、山頂部付近に広がる古木の群落である。この原生林には地上最古の樹木、たとえばヒノキや樹齢1000年以上の屋久杉がある。中でも著名木に指定された縄文杉は高さ25メートル強、幹の太さは16メートルを越え、樹齢は2000年以上と推定される。

2011年春、上田義彦はこの古木と原生林を撮影するため、屋久島を訪れた。20年間あたため続けてきた屋久島行きを、いよいよ実行に移さねばという思いに駆られたからだ。それは、巨大地震と大津波が日本の東北地方を襲い、1万5000人以上もの死者を出した直後のことだった。

屋久島への途上、今回の撮影は、1990年代初めにアメリカ合衆国の西海岸北部の、雨にけむるクゥィノルト雨林地帯で手がけたシリーズと対をなすものになるだろうと思っていた。靄と霧雨に永遠に閉ざされたあの世界には、苔や野花や木の実が大量に自生し、世界最大級のトウヒや、スギ、モミ、カエデなどが生息している。クゥィノルトで最初に上田を襲った感覚は、畏怖の念だった。「まさに原初の混沌が支配する領域を発見した人間の気分だった」と彼は書いている。「人が目にするはずのないものを僕は目撃したのだ」と。そのとき彼のカメラが捕らえたものは、太陽光がかろうじて届く神秘の海底世界といった雰囲気を漂わせ、屹立する老木が息苦しいほどに密生した光景だ。多くの樹木は燐光を発する苔にびっしりと覆われ、ずんぐりと太く短い枝が残るばかり。これが腕を前に突き出して歩く亡霊を思わせ、不気味な雰囲気を醸し出している。上田の写真は、暗いクゥィノルトの森に生きる、めくるめくほど多彩な生命体を巧みに表現する一方、逞しきエコシステムが時のなかで繰り広げる相互関係をも暗示する。そのあたりのことは、じっくり時間をかけることで見えてくるはずだ。

2011年春、屋久島に着き、8x10カメラをセットしながら上田は、自然の力に目を向けよう、この島の古木群に宿る不屈の生命力に焦点を当てようと思っていた。この時点では、かつてクゥィノルトで撮った写真がくっきりとイメージされていた。ところが屋久島の山頂部の森でカメラを構え、ピントグラスに映る像を目にした瞬間、これはまったく新しい撮影方法でのぞむ必要があると感じた。クゥィノルトでの撮影当時、彼はまだ30代で、子供もいなかった。それが今は50代になり、4人の子供の父親として家庭を築いている。以前は、被写体のあらゆる視覚要素をあらかじめ計算しておかないと気がすまない、妥協を許さぬ完全主義者だった。それが今は、写真の偶然性に魅力を見出し、時としてカメラが瞬時に捕らえる思いがけない光景を愛するようにもなっていた。

上田は言う、屋久島の木々や森を静かに見つめていると、自然界が作り出す生命の循環や、幾重にも積み重なった時間がありありと感じられると。彼の眼差しは、巨木の幹(「木の幹」を意味するラテン語materiaから、今回の写真集のタイトルは生まれた)だけでなく、森の地面に降り積もる黄色い枯葉や、小さな青葉をつけた若枝をも捕らえている。万物には目的があり意味がある、そしてすべてはつながっている。これこそ自然界が謳いあげる歓喜だと、上田は理解した。胸に湧きあがる曰く言い難いこの感慨を伝えるべく、写真に関する自らの知識を総動員して、新しい視覚言語を、とりわけ屋久島での体験に即した視覚言語を作ろうと心に決めた。

写真集『MATERIA』の何よりも驚くべき特徴は、多くの写真家が技術的ミスと呼びたくなるようなものを、意図的に表現手段に転化している点にある。これによって、絶えず変化し続け予測不能な、この森の生命のありようを視覚的に提示している。たとえば『QUNAULT』では森の鮮明な画像を得るために、彼は夾雑物をことごとく排する努力を惜しまなかった。ところが『MATERIA』では、倒木の太い幹が前景を横切り、核となる巨木が部分的に隠れるような位置にカメラを据えている。また『QUINAULT』の作品はどれも、前景から背景に至るまで、シーン全体にくっきりとピントが合っている。しかし『MATERIA』では、それ以上に特異なアプローチが試みられている。一個の物体、あるいはピント面にのみ焦点を当て、それ以外の部分はぼやけるにまかせているのだ。さらに『QUINAULT』では、暗く沈んだ青と緑の色彩が靄のたちこめる鬱蒼とした森を表現しているのに対し、『MATERIA』のほうは容赦ない光に晒されている。多くの作品には敢えて露出オーバーにしたと思しき箇所があり、まるで光の炸裂をいきなり受けたかのように細部の画像が飛んでいる。詰まるところ、はっと息を呑むようなこうした「撮影ミス」によって、時の流れが樹齢1000年の古木に現出するさまを、予想外の方法で生々しく我々にイメージさせるのである。老木の存在感は、シダや花や虫や鳥といったはかない生命体の騒めきとにじみに包まれて、ゆっくりと開示されるのだ。

時に上田のカメラは、遮蔽物のない情景を求めて後退する。そういう時はたいてい、鬱蒼とした森に居場所を求める若木の群落の、1本の古木に寄り添うさまを我々に示そうとしている。折れた枝やその他自然物の残骸の向こうにちらりと覗く倒木も、作品に繰り返し登場する。これらの情景が喚起するのは、豊かな土壌を育み次世代の成長に備える、確固とした目的を持つ腐敗だ。こんなふうに陰気なイメージに時おり思いめぐらすうちに、延々と繰り返される自然界の生命の循環に具わる深遠なるヴィジョンが、見る者のなかにじわじわと形作られていくのである。

19世紀に写真が誕生して以来、洗練された視覚芸術家の手にかかると写真媒体がいかに多くのことを成し遂げられるかを、樹木や森の写真は物語ってきた。思い浮かぶままに例を挙げれば、1840年代のイギリスで、ウィリアム・ヘンリー・フォックス・タルボットは、枝も露わな冬枯れの木を影絵のような写真に残した。1860年代、チャールトン・ワトキンスはカリフォルニアのヨセミテ渓谷でセコイアの巨木群をカメラに収めた。1920年代に福原信三が撮った写真には、木の葉や枝が作り出す繊細なパターンを見ることができる。またエドワード・ウェストンの1930年代の写真は、樹木のとびきり官能的なフォルムを表現した。上田義彦の写真集『MATERIA』はまさに、こうした優れた功績の系譜に連なるものだと言えるだろう。

ICP(ニューヨーク)キュレーター