YOSHIHIKO UEDA | 上田義彦

books

M.Ganges

2014, 916Press & Akaaka Art Publishing, 916 Press & 赤々舎

Design : Hideki Nakajima

Photographs in a state of flux: Yoshihiko Ueda’s “M.Ganges”

Shigeo Goto (Editor / Professor of Kyoto University of Art and Design)

 

Photographs do not travel. It is the world and people who usually travel. Photographs stay in the same place.

If images were to travel, then they would be a film and not a photograph at all.

Whether taken in that one decisive moment or over a period of more than eight hours, like when Niépce photographed the view from the window of his Le Gras estate, an image is something immobile sculpted from light. Niépce fixed the image from his camera obscura onto a pewter plate, and within the nuance of what he called “heliography” is an intuition about the origin of something in which the world describes its own shape. (As it is at the heart of what Talbot called “the pencil of nature.”)

Human beings thereafter reduced the size of the camera and began reconstructing it to become “the friend of movement,” but do photographs really travel? It is the division between “travel” and “anti-travel” that is at the origin of the photograph. A powerful impulse is torn apart.

Interestingly, during the same period as that of the advent of photography, writers such as Proust and Baudelaire were born, writers who early on understood the possibility for “transformation of the imagination” that photographs provided, as well as Impressionist painters such as Courbet and Manet who “transformed painting.” Alongside them, “inventors of things that move” such as the Montgolfier brothers, inventors of the hot air balloon, were vying for precedence. (Niépce had also created a prototype of a bicycle.) Invention giving rise to division.

The stillness of travel / movement. Stamping “world” on a place that one is already in. Is it possible to make a world that is so fluid stop moving? The impossibility of capturing it.

The initial impulse, the desire at the time photography first came into being was very powerful. They have been powerful throughout the history of mankind and that is why in the short period of time up to now, photography has infiltrated every place on the globe.

Travelling without moving, travelling without travelling. That is a photograph. Yoshihiko Ueda’s purpose, therefore, in moving towards the forest or the river, shouldering a large box camera, is of course not travel. Although Yoshihiko Ueda moves, the photograph does not. He is unrelated to exoticism. It is because he is recklessly trying to go against the current, towards the impulse that a photograph possesses at its origin. He selects a location in which the “world” has opened up for him and tries standing there “as he is.” In much the same way as Niépce stood before the view at Le Gras, his camera in position.

The thing that is important, however, is something called “guidance.” What place should I choose? What should I photograph? As soon as you start relying on “I” and “reasons,” it disappears / dissipates. In order, therefore, to sense an impulse / guidance, the reason for which is unclear, one has to be scrupulous to a frightening degree. All existing methods are rendered ineffective. What will guide Yoshihiko Ueda? How will he arrive at the origins? Varanasi at the mouth of the Ganges. Yoshihiko Ueda’s photographs were taken here. The photographs that started in the forests and rivers of Yakushima have led him to the Ganges.

The Ganges is a special river for Hindu people, visited by millions of people each year from around India so as to bathe in it. It is more than just a river. It is a current of holy water flowing from “heaven,” possessing the power to transform the lives of people who are filled with shame. People, whatever their circumstances, turn to the Ganges at least once in their life to wash away the “unclean” and to revive themselves. That impulse is connected to the origin of “life.”

It has already been said above, but what motivates Yoshihiko Ueda is not the foreign land of India or the outlook of the Hindu religion. This large river is a primitive chaos that flushes away the structures that human beings attempt to establish, such as “man versus nature” and “natural versus man-made.” He is merely standing on the most concentrated border where people and water meet, with his camera at the ready. What will come into view as he stands there? What kind of images will pass in front of him? What will the photographs pick up on?

The thread that led Yoshihiko Ueda to the Ganges was the rocks scattered in the rivers of Yakushima. In that “connection,” however, there is no logic or association with an image. That intuition is mysterious. There is no such thing as a “reason.” What there is simply “guidance.” Did something involving “the state of flux and photographs” beckon him? While thinking this maybe the case, I look back over the photographs Yoshihiko Ueda brought back with him again and again.

Water is unevenly distributed both in this world and in the human body, and phantasmagorically, it is in the form of a liquid in the river and the sea, floating in the air as a cloud, vaporizing to become invisible. Both plants and animals contain water in equal measure and it is the nucleus of life. The “state of flux” tends to be thought of as a metaphor for a river that flows from the upstream to the downstream, for example, like the large, long scroll painting by the artist Taikan Yokoyama, but I believe that the water itself that is constantly changing in appearance is a form of henge (a fundamental transformation in which something becomes experientially different from before). There is no life or death. There is only constant change. Is that not the blessing of the world that is Materia, the world that is life?

Yoshihiko Ueda stands on the banks of Varanasi, with his large camera at the ready. The men gathered at the waterside waiting to bathe in the waters of the Ganges, have on this most special of days, removed all their clothing and are completely naked. The women have adorned themselves in beautiful colors. Once he has decided on the position of the camera, Yoshihiko Ueda does not move it. He photographs whatever comes within the frame within the half-day. Most of the photographs will be out of focus. The camera that was an alien object to people in the beginning has in no time at all been swallowed up by the chaos and becomes meaningless. Yoshihiko Ueda also becomes meaningless. What in the world is he doing? There is no such thing as a “proper photograph.” They are all photographs.

The initial impulse of the photograph. The photograph can still replay the same kind of excitement that Niépce experienced when his image was imprinted for the first time. What must not be forgotten, however, is the fact that our ability to be pure has reached the point of being impossible. It is the discarding of the fact that we are human and responding to material objects that will lead the way. The power of the photograph lies not in the history of photography that has been organized and turned into a story. The force that attempts to deviate from, to run away from photography and its inherent lack of control has in fact brought life to photography. That is the paradox of photography. Yoshihiko Ueda chooses to let the focus do as it will, and in taking photographs of people and the river, attempts to generate the vivid power that lies in the origin of photography, without reference to place name or races of people. The people by the waterside lose their shape and change their color. However, such a splendid deviation!

Now, the line of flight in the photographs that he has given the title “Materia” began in the woods of Yakushima, turned towards the river and the sea, and led to the river Ganges. It is of course however not the goal or the promised land, and the “topography of the photographs” is scattered here and there on the earth like the islands in an archipelago, connecting with each other and causing a chemical reaction that is larger than people would have anticipated.

The photographs in “Materia: Ganges” are made up of multiple photographs, some from two and some from three. It is an artless form of expression that attempts skilfully to incorporate the transition of time, in which one can sense the series of photographs of the sea in Materia casting a shadow. The grammar when taking a photograph that is the non-determinist nature of the waves on the sea (no two have the same genesis. Yet, in repeating, appear to be the same). From the state of flux of the photograph, Yoshihiko Ueda relearns photography. He starts again.

In “Materia: Ganges,” the people who appear in front of the camera accidentally are separated from the rest and their photograph taken. It is not a case of good or bad, correct or incorrect. Just the excitement of the latent image of the person emerging for the first time. A kind of halting excitement, such as that when hope and failure intertwine. It has no negative meaning. Despite the fact that it is impossible, Yoshihiko Ueda keeps trying persistently to replay it. It is a photograph of a brilliant deviation. The line of flight called Materia leads the way to the Ganges, and attempts to extend to human figures also.

Discarding the photographs of death and turning towards life is Materia. What direction is the state of flux of the photographs taking? Yoshihiko Ueda is a rare kind of photographer, one who commits himself to the turbulence of a journey that cannot become a journey and who enjoys the risk involved more than anyone else.

写真の生々流転 上田義彦のM.Ganges
後藤繁雄(編集者/京都造形芸術大学教授)

 

写真は旅をしない。旅するのはつねに世界や人の方であり、写真は動かない。もし映像が旅をするならそれは映画であり、写真ではない。
写真は決定的な瞬時であっても、あるいはニエプスがル・グラの窓からの景色を露光した8時間以上におよぶ時間であれ、等しく、一枚の画像を不動において、光で彫るものだ。ニエプスがカメラオブスキュラ像を、石版の上に定着させ、それを、ヘリオグラフィ(太陽の描画)と呼んだニュアンスの中には、写真とは、世界が自らの姿を記述するもの、という起源の直感がある(また、タルボットが『自然の鉛筆』と呼んだものの中にも)。
その後、人間たちは写真機を小型化し、移動の友へと改造していったのだが、はたして写真は旅などするものか。写真の起源にあるものは「、旅」と反「旅」の、分裂である。引き裂かれた強い衝動だ。
興味深いことに、写真誕生の同時代、プルーストやボードレールのような、写真がもたらした「イマジネーションの変容」にいち早く深く感知した文学者が生まれたし、また、マネやクールベや印象派にいたる「絵画を変容させた」画家が生まれた。それらと並走し、気球をつくり出したモンゴルフィエ兄弟のような「移動にまつわる発明家」たちも群雄割拠した(ニエプスも自転車の原型を発明している)。インベンションとは、分裂の誕生のことだ。
旅/移動と静止。ここにいながらにして「世界」を封印すること。流体としての世界をいかに止めることができるのか。生け捕りの不可能性。
写真が誕生した時の初期衝動、その欲望は非常に強い。人類史上においても、圧倒的に強いものであり、それ故に、これほどまでの短時間に地球のあらゆる場所に写真を伝染させた。
動かずして旅すること、旅せずして旅すること。それが写真だ。だから上田義彦が大型のボックスカメラを背負い、森や河を移動するのは、もちろん旅をするためではない。上田義彦が移動したとしても、写真は移動しない。彼はエキゾチシズムとは無縁だ。彼は無謀にも、写真が起源にもつ衝動へ向かって遡航しようとするからである。「世界」がみずからを開いてくれる場所を選び、「あるがまま」に立ちあおうとするのだ。まるでニエプスがル・グラの風景を前に、写真機を据えたように。
しかし、「みちびき」というものは重要である。どこを選び、何を写真にすればよいか。それは「私」や「理屈」に依存したとたん消滅/霧散する。したがって理由が定かではない衝動/みちびきを感知するには、恐ろしいほど細心でなければならない。すべての既存の方法は失効する。上田義彦は何にみちびかれ、いかにして起源にたどりつこうというのか?
ガンジス河の河口ベナレス。上田義彦の写真はここで撮られた。屋久島の森や河に始まった写真がガンジスへとみちびいたのだ。
ガンジスはヒンドゥー教にとり唯一無二の特別な河であり、その河での沐浴のために、インド中から年間何百万の人々が訪れる。ガンジスはただの河ではなく、「天」から流出した聖水の流れであり、汚辱に満ちた人の生を変換させる、絶対的な力を持つ。人は何があっても一生に一度は、ガンジスへ向かう、「けがれ」を洗い流し、蘇生させるために。その衝動は「生」の根源にかかわるものなのだろう。
しかし再度言うが、上田義彦をつき動かしているものは、インドという異境でも、ヒンドゥーという宗教観でも決してない。まして、この大河は人間が設定しようとする「人間対自然」「自然対人工」などという枠組みを流れ崩す、原始のカオスである。彼はその、人と水が出会う最も密度の高い境界線に立ち写真機を据えるだけだ。そこに立つと、何が見えてくるのか。何が像として去来するのか。写真が何を感知するのか。
上田義彦をガンジス河に導いた糸は、屋久島の河に散らばる岩であったと彼は語った。しかしその「接続」には、理屈もイメージの連想もない。その直感は謎めいている。理由などない、あるのは、みちびきだけだ。「流転と写真」にまつわる何かが彼を誘ったのか。そう思いながら、上田義彦が持ち帰った写真を何度も見返している。
水はこの世界にも人体にも偏在するし、変幻自在に海や河には液体としてあり、雲として宙に浮かび、気化しては不可視なものとなる。動物の中、植物の中に水は等しくあり、それがいのちの核だ。「生々流転」とは、例えば、画家・横山大観が描いた長大なスクロール絵画のように、河の上流から下流にいたるメタファーと思いがちだが、私にはつねに姿を変える水そのもの、不動の水の変化(へんげ)の様だと思われる。生も死もなく、ただ変わり続ける様。それがマテリアとしての世界、いのちとしての世界の、ありがたさなのではないか。
上田義彦がベナレスの河岸に立ち、大型のカメラを据える。沐浴するために水辺に集まった人々は、その特別な日のために、女たちは色を尽くして着飾り、また男たちは、すべてを捨て裸形となる。カメラの場所を一度決めると、上田義彦はそれを変えない。写真の中に入り込んでくるもの、それを半日そこにいて撮る。それも、大半をアウトオブフォーカスで。写真機という最初は人々にとっての異物は、あっというまに、カオスに飲み込まれ、無意味になる。上田義彦も無意味になる。いったい何をしているのだ。写真には「正しい写真」などない。ただ写真であるだけだ。写真の初期衝動。ニエプスやタルボットがはじめて像を焼き付けた時に得た興奮と同じものを、まだ写真はリプレイできる。しかし、忘れてはならないのは、我々が「無垢」たりうることは、もはや決定的に不可能なところまで来ているということ。人であることを捨て、モノに感応することが、みちびきとなる。写真の力は、実は、整理され物語化された写真史にはない。写真に内在するコントロール不能の、写真から逸脱し、写真から逃走しようという力が、実は写真のいのちをうみ出してきた。写真、その逆説。上田義彦がフォーカスをはずすことを選び、人や河を撮るのは、固有の地名や人種をはぎとり、写真の起源にある生々しい力を生成させようとするものだ。河辺の人々は形を失い、色に変化していく。しかし、その逸脱のなんと美しいこと!
今、上田義彦における、マテリアと名付けられた写真の逃走線は、屋久島の森に始まり、河や海に向かい、そして今ガンジス河へとたどりついた。しかしもちろんゴールや、約束の地などではなく、その「写真の地誌」は地球上のあちこちに群島的に飛びちり、接続しあい、人々の予測をこえた化学反応を起こしていくだろう。
マテリア・ガンジスの写真は、あるものは2枚や3枚など複数の写真から構成されている。それは時の遷移をたくみに取り入れようとする初々しい表現であり、マテリアの海の連作が影を落としているのを感じる。海の波の非決定性(同じ源はひとつとしてない。にもかかわらず反復され同じように見える)という、写真の時の文法。その写真の生々流転から、上田義彦は、もう一度、写真を学び直す。やりなおす。
また、マテリア・ガンジスの中には、カメラの前にアクシデンタルにあらわれた人物を切断し、撮影したものがある。「いい」とか「わるい」でも、「正しい」とか「まちがっている」でもなく、ただ、初めて人物の潜像が浮かび上がった時の興奮。希望と流産がないまぜになったような、たどたどしい興奮。否定的な意味ではなく、不可能性にもかかわらず、リプレイしてみせるために上田義彦は執拗にやり続けるのだ。ブリリアントな逸脱の写真だ。マテリアという逃走線が、ガンジスをみちびき、そして、そのラインは「人物」に伸びようとしている。
死の写真を捨て、いのちにむかうことが、マテリアということだ。その写真の生々流転が、いったいどこへ向かうのか。旅ならざる旅の乱気流に身をゆだねながら、誰よりもその危うさをエンジョイしている、上田義彦という類い稀な写真家がここにいる。